Meet The Board: Joshua Roeder (Member-at-Large)

We continue along this week introducing our new Executive Board members! This week the focus is on our new member-at-large Joshua Roeder, a Ph.D. student at Drew University.

How long have you been involved with CSS? What brought you to CSS?

I remember in 2017 my advisor telling me about an upcoming new journal named Inks
and a new scholars society. I was lucky enough to jump on board to become a Comics
Studies Society Founding Member back then and I’ve been following its development
since then.

What was the first comic that you remember reading, or the first that really had an
impact on you as a reader?

Hellboy by Mike Mignola. Hands down my favorite character and Mignola’s artistry is too
beautiful for us mere mortals. After watching Ron Perlman portray Hellboy on the big
screen back in 2004, I had to get my hands on more material which lead me to comic
books.

What are you reading now that you think others should look into?

The Immortal Hulk (2018 – Present). Al Ewing’s writing makes this superhero into a real
monster horror series. The imagery and panels Joe Bennett, Paul Mounts, Belardino
Brabo, Cam Smith, and Ruy Jose create are just as amazing. It really shakes up the
typical superhero formula. I also just started using the Shonen Jump’s smart phone app
to keep up on Eiichiro Oda’s One Piece series.

What comics scholar has most impacted your current research, and why?

Jean-Paul Gabilliet and his work Of Comics and Men: A Cultural History of American
Comic Books
, which is a true interdisciplinary study that covers the rise of the American
comic-book industry in the 1930s to present day. I love this multifaceted approach. At
the end of his work, Gabilliet acknowledges the lack of analysis on audience history
through letter columns. This has helped in validating my current research.

Is there any recent shift in the field of comics studies that you are particularly
excited about?

I’m super excited about the recent connectedness of all us comic scholars since the first
CSS conference! For a long while, being an American historian and comics scholar felt
like being on a small, isolated island. Now, not only have different perspectives become
accessible, but making important connections has been amazingly easier now.

Who is the comics writer/artist/scholar that has most influenced the way you
think about the field?

Scot McCloud and Understanding Comics was the first piece of comic book scholarship
that opened up the field of study to me. While more nuanced works have come out
since then, his was the one that opened up the theoretical possibilities.

If you could choose one comic writer or artist to meet who would it be and why?

Mike Mignola. Again, I love his art style so much and the character writing for Hellboy is
superb. I would like to personally thank him for getting me hooked into reading comic
books.

What are you currently working on and do you have plans for future projects?

I’m about to be working on my prospectus and then move on to my dissertation phase.
I’m hoping to work on audience reception history of mainstream comic books. With that
in mind, I’ll hopefully have more presentations and articles to give and publish!

How can folks get in contact with you to talk more about comics or your
research?

I can be found on Twitter @joro_89, Facebook, or email at jroeder@drew.edu.

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Meet the Board: Evan Ash (Vice President)

The recent elections for the Executive Board both in CSS and in the Grad Caucus has brought new scholars into leadership roles. We want to continue highlighting the new board members as they step into these roles. This week, we focus on the new Vice President of the Graduate Student Caucus, Evan Ash, who is a Ph.D. student in History at the University of Maryland.

How long have you been involved with CSS? What brought you to CSS?

I have been involved with CSS since shortly before its 2019 conference. Like many important things in my life, I can’t remember exactly what brought me to CSS. Probably a lucky Google.

What was the first comic that you remember reading, or the first that really had an impact on you as a reader?

I started to get more interested in comics after seeing The Dark Knight Rises in 2012. I think Watchmen was the first comic that I can recall reading, but Preacher was probably the first series I read all the way though in the summer of 2014.

What are you reading now that you think others should look into?

I’ve been reading some older Justice Society comics, and wrapped up America vs. The Justice Society. I’ve also been reading Ben Katchor’s Cheap Novelties: The Pleasures of Urban Decay. Those comic strips are rich for analysis in many ways.

What comics scholar has most impacted your current research, and why?

Amy Kiste Nyberg wrote the book (Seal of Approval: The History of the Comics Code) that pointed me to the eventual topic of my MA thesis. She was influential in the personal development of that project as well, serving as a reader and meeting with me out in New Jersey.

Is there any recent shift in the field of comics studies that you are particularly excited about?

I’m eager to keep broadening the historical dimensions of comics studies. There have been a few books recently (for example, by Lara Saguisag and Qiana Whitted) that have interested me, but that I just haven’t had the time to get through them yet.

Who is the comics writer/artist/scholar that has most influenced the way you think about the field?

Carol Tilley, without a doubt. Her observations about youth, power, and censorship have been integral in my thinking, writing, and research. I’m very lucky to be able to count Carol as a treasured mentor.

If you could choose one comic writer or artist to meet who would it be and why?

I would love to meet Leah Williams. She’s probably the current writer that I’ve read the most, and I really enjoy her social media presence.

What are you currently working on and do you have plans for future projects?

I’m very busy finishing up Ph.D. coursework, but I’m writing a dissertation prospectus that focuses on American anti-comics criticism, moral politics, and their impact on children set within midcentury America.

I have a paper that I’m hoping to whittle down into an article on the partnership that National Comics (now DC) had with the National Social Welfare Assembly to produce public service comics. I also have an entry in the forthcoming Encyclopedia of the American Left on left-wing graphic novels since 2000 and an article on a decent literature group in my hometown of Green Bay, WI coming out Fall 2020/Winter 2021. As long as it is still happening, I will be presenting at ICAF@SPX on my National-NSWA project.

As far as future desires are concerned, I’m plotting a web article on portrayals of the 1950s in modern comics, and far down the road, I would love to start an edited collection that expands historical thinking about the American anti-comics movement beyond Fredric Wertham and the senate hearings that transpired.

How can folks get in contact with you to talk more about comics or your research?

For serious questions and conversations, my email inbox (erash@umd.edu) is always open, and I’m eager to build working relationships.

If you just want to see what’s up, follow me on Twitter @evanthevoice.

Stay tuned for more Meet the Board interviews in the coming weeks!

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Meet the Board: Member-at-Large Bryan Bove

In this installment of “Meet the Board” we hear from current Member-at-Large, Bryan Bove. Bryan is an M.A. student in Interdisciplinary Studies at New York University in the Center for Experimental Humanities and Social Engagement.

How long have you been involved with CSS? What brought you to CSS?

I first learned of CSS in March or April of 2018. I went to the three professors in my department at NYU who I was taking classes with and told them how I wanted to become more involved with other scholars in my field, and they encouraged me to find listservs and websites that suited my academic interests. Once I found CSS, I knew immediately it was the right community for me.

What was the first comic that you remember reading, or the first that really had an impact on you as a reader?

The first comic I remember reading was Giant-Size X-Men #1 that was part of a bigger volume I bought on vacation at Universal Studios in Florida when I was about 13. I was drawn to the diversity of the team, and in later issues, to the sci-fi melodrama of writer Chris Claremont. I started buying other X-related titles that were out at the time, like Generation X, Peter Milligan and Mike Allred’s X-Force/X-Statix, and Grant Morrison and Frank Quitely’s New X-Men. As a closeted, lower-middle class queer teen living in Long Island, New York, the themes of tolerance, acceptance, and inclusion were deeply appreciated.

What are you reading now that you think others should look into?

Recently I re-read America by Gabby Rivera and Joe Quinones and Young Avengers by Kieron Gillen and Jamie McKelvie for a paper I was working on about queer Latinx diaspora in Marvel comics, and I remembered how much I loved the inventiveness and boldness of both series. I’m also currently tearing through The Unbeatable Squirrel Girl and trying to stay up-to-date on all the X-Men titles. I loved Multiple Man and New Mutants: Dead Souls by Matt Rosenberg.

What comics scholar has most impacted your current research, and why?

I’m still fairly new to the field of comics studies and working on exploring it more deeply, but so far I’d say Ramzi Fawaz and Hillary Chute have had the greatest impact on my current research. Fawaz’s The New Mutants has been extremely helpful in shaping the ideas for my thesis, and Chute’s Why Comics? was a great read that allowed me to make connections outside of the world of mainstream comics.

Is there any recent shift in the field of comics studies that you are particularly excited about?

I’m mostly excited about how much more respected comics studies is as a field compared to when I was first applying to masters programs in 2013, and I hope it continues to grow and find its place within the world of academia.

Who is the comics writer/artist/scholar that has most influenced the way you think about the field?

I’ve been lucky enough to meet a lot of influential writers and artists who I admire within the comics industry at various conventions, like the New York Comic Con or Flame Con, but I’d say the one writer/artist who has most influenced how I think about comics and what they can represent is Sina Grace, writer of the Iceman solo comic. I love what he’s done with that character, and how he’s made this unabashedly queer comic/hero while staying true to the mythos of the character. For the same reasons I really admire Gabby Rivera and her work on America. Grace, Rivera, and other LGBT+ writers and artists (like Kris Anka and Kevin Wada) are taking the preconceived notions of what a superhero is and can be and revolutionizing them in really fantastic ways for a wider audience, and I think that’s amazing.

If you could choose one comic writer or artist to meet who would it be and why?

It’s really hard to choose only one, but I’d love to meet Mike Allred. I was introduced to his work first through X-Force/X-Statix, but I’ve loved everything he’s ever done, from the obscure Citizen Nocturne and Red Rocket 7 to Madman and his run on Silver Surfer. I love the classic 1960s pop art vibe of his drawing style, and his wife Laura Allred’s color work is brilliant. I also love his storytelling, which is often nostalgic and heartbreaking. I may or may not have a tattoo of a scene from X-Force on my arm, that’s how much I love his work. Can I also give honorable mentions to Kelly Thompson and G. Willow Wilson? Because it seems like every time I find a new favorite, it’s written by one of them. They are geniuses.   

What are you currently working on and do you have plans for future projects?

I’m currently working on my thesis for my master’s in interdisciplinary studies at NYU, which deals with sexual identity, non-normative masculinity, and continuity in Marvel’s X-Men comics. It focuses on three characters specifically (Iceman, Rictor, and Shatterstar) and has the working title “‘How Can They Be Gay?’ Writing Marvel Heroes Out Of The Closet And Into The Cape.” I plan on doing it as a comic, so right now I’m editing the written portion of it. I’m also working on my own comic and website, which I’m hoping to launch sometime this spring.

You can follow Bryan on Twitter @nerdbove and on Instagram @bboveart.

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Meet the Board: Secretary/Treasurer Adrienne Resha

Ms. Marvel by G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona, Cover by Cliff Chiang

Continuing our series of posts introducing the current board for the Graduate Student Caucus, this week features Secretary/Treasurer, Adrienne Resha. Adrienne is a Ph.D. Student in American Studies at the College of William & Mary.

How long have you been involved with CSS? What brought you to CSS?

My one year anniversary falls on January 9th, 2019, according to the receipt for my Inks subscription. I had been working on something (“The Blue Age of Comic Books”) that was perfect for the first annual conference. I sent the proposal just before New Year’s, and knew that if it was accepted (it was), then I had to be a member to attend and present. It’s not a particularly romantic story, but it doesn’t have to be.

What was the first comic that you remember reading, or the first that really had an impact on you as a reader?

I’ve read comics for most of my life, but I grew up reading manga, not American comic books. The first American comic that really had an impact on me was G. Willow Wilson and Adrian Alphona’s Ms. Marvel. Kamala Khan was the first Muslim superhero to have her own title. To have a character like her in a tradition that spanned, then, seventy-five years meant that she was (to borrow from Wilson) part of something bigger. A lot of people have rightfully compared her to Peter Parker’s Spider-Man, but, for me, she’s most like Superman. That’s what I ended up writing my master’s thesis about, the series and Kamala Khan’s relationship to her antecedents, and I used an excerpt from that to apply to the doctoral program I’m in now. Ms. Marvel took me from reader to researcher.

What are you reading now that you think others should look into?

The new Miles Morales: Spider-Man by Saladin Ahmed and Javier Garrón. I loved Ahmed and Christian Ward’s work on Black Bolt, and recommend it to everyone, but I’m really excited to see what Ahmed gets to do with Miles Morales. I’m also reading My Hero Academia by Kōhei Horikoshi. Now’s a great time to get started with the manga thanks to Shonen Jump’s new digital subscription service. And I’m not reading it now, but when Ahmed’s run on Ms. Marvel with Minkyu Jung starts in March, I’ll be reading that.

What comics scholar has most impacted your current research, and why?

He wasn’t strictly a comics studies scholar, but, before Reel Bad Arabs: How Hollywood Vilifies a People, Jack Shaheen studied representations of Arabs in comic books. He advocated for more nuanced representations of Arabs and Muslims in American popular media. His work, particularly on comics, informs my work on superheroes like Kamala Khan, Khalid Nassour (Doctor Fate), and Simon Baz (Green Lantern).

Is there any recent shift in the field of comics studies that you are particularly excited about?

After I presented “Blue Age” at CSS18, Rebecca Wanzo tweeted, “one of the interesting things about comics studies is the interdisciplinary diversity and that there are SUCH divergent attachments to the field now. New people coming in without a long history of comics reading—producing very different perspectives.” I think that’s what I’m most excited about: that there are different perspectives emerging. I’m excited about being able to offer one of them, one of many.

Who is the comics writer/artist/scholar that has most influenced the way you think about the field?

I’m going to name two people since Josh gave about a dozen in one of his answers (and I could still name more). CSS Vice President Candida Rifkind and former GSC Secretary-Treasurer Rachel Miller. As much in their scholarship as in their service, they’ve shaped the way I relate to CSS and, more broadly, comics studies as a field.

If you could choose one comic writer or artist to meet who would it be and why?

G. Willow Wilson. I wouldn’t be where I am now if not for Ms. Marvel, and I’d love to be able to thank her in person. Sana Amanat, although neither a writer nor an artist, too.

What are you currently working on and do you have plans for future projects?

I’m reading for my qualifying exams right now. I’m also writing for Women Write About Comics. And, this year, I’ll start working in earnest on my dissertation. It’ll be about Blue Age superheroes Kamala Khan, Khalid Nassour, and Simon Baz; the people who made/make their comics; and the people, like and unlike me, who they represent.

How can folks get in contact with you to talk more about comics or your research?

On Twitter @AdrienneResha or through my website adrienneresha.com.

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Meet the Board: President Joshua Abraham Kopin

In the coming weeks, we will be introducing our Board Members in posts where they discuss their relationship to comics and comics studies. We are starting with our intrepid President, Joshua Abraham Kopin. Josh works in American Studies and is a Ph.D. Candidate at the University of Texas at Austin.

How long have you been involved with CSS? What brought you to CSS?

I was at the International Comics Art Forum meeting at Ohio State University in 2014 when the CSS was voted into being, and I attended the first meeting of the CSS Graduate Student Caucus that same weekend. I have been a member ever since, and I have served on the GSC Executive Board since then too, first as the web editor and then as the vice-president and now as the president. What former GSC president Colin Bieneke has called my “tyrannical rise to power” ends this spring, when my term does. Working to grow comics studies through advocating for graduate students and early career scholars as part of the GSC has been one of the great honors and few pleasures of my time in graduate school, and I would encourage people to run for the member-at-large positions, the secretary-treasurer position, and the vice-presidency, all of which will be open this spring.

What was the first comic that you remember reading, or the first that really had an impact on you as a reader?

I started buying Uncanny X-Men issues in 2002 or 2003, around the time that the second X-Men movie came out. Angel and Husk were dating. Northstar was on the team. Nightcrawler was… studying to be a priest? It was a weird time. But there were some great comics then, including the first iteration of Exiles, my favorite Marvel comic of all time. Today that book is being written by Saladin Ahmed, one of my favorite prose authors, and it’s still a blast. At the same time, I was spending a lot of time at my local public library, reading their collection of graphic novels, which seemed to grow bigger every week. That was my first exposure to works that are still some of my favorites: Sandman, Transmetropolitan, Fun Home, The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen, Concrete, Blankets, you know… the classics. The first comic that made me want to study comics, though, was Ed Brubaker’s Captain America. It’s a little on the nose: the study of comics is a variety of the study of symbols, and it’s hard to get more blatantly symbolic than a man running around wearing tights that look like the American flag. I’m glad I’ve moved on to other things. Brubaker’s Cap comics hold up, though, particularly the ones drawn by Steve Epting.

What are you reading now that you think others should look into?

Unfortunately, my comics reading has gotten kind of sparse, and I’m a little less checked in than I used to be. But Ahmed’s Exiles, drawn mostly by the very talented Javier Rodriguez, is great fun, and I like the style of the Shuri series written by another favorite prose writer, Nnedi Okorafor, and drawn by Leonardo Romero in the round, flat-colored style of Paolo Rivera, Marcos Martin, and Rodriguez that I’ve come to love most in the last few years. I also just read the collection of Tillie Walden’s On A Sunbeam, probably my favorite work from this past year, which is a beautifully drawn and imagined queer sci-fi romance set in a universe with big mysterious history and without men. It has some nice consonances with my favorite ongoing media, the cartoon Steven Universe, and I would love to see Walden explore it some more. Then there’s the stuff I’m always coming back to, like John Porcellino’s King Cat collections and Peanuts and Ronald Wimberly’s Prince of Cats, and then the stuff I’m reading to better round out my knowledge of European, Latin American and Asian comics, which is an easier prospect than it used to be now that so much stuff is getting translated.

What comics scholar has most impacted your current research, and why?

I’m tempted to say that it’s someone working in the interdisciplinary cultural studies mode that I’m trying to work in, like Ramzi Fawaz and Jared Gardner, or someone whose work I really admire, like Carol Tilley, Scott Bukatman, or Chris Pizzino. I also thought about saying Martha Kennedy or Caitlin McGurk, since one of the best things about comics studies is the visibility of the work done by archivists as well as those by professors, although we, like every other discipline, could be doing better in that regard. Now that I’ve already mentioned, uh, seven, people, though, I’m going to go ahead and keep cheating, and say that it has been my community of graduate peers, more than anyone else, who have given me the will to keep going when the prospect of staying in school seemed like it was just too much. I was so, so lucky to meet Ben Owen, Frederik Kohlert, Colin Beineke, Biz Nijdam, Rachel Miller and Forrest Johnson at that first ICAF in Columbus, and then to speak on a panel organized by Margaret Galvan and Leah Misemer, who have been two of my most important mentors, at MLA in Austin in 2016. And then I went to the ICAF in Columbia, South Carolina that spring where I met Francesca Lyn and Jeremy Carnes… and that’s not to mention the folks who weren’t graduate students when I first met them, like Osvaldo Oyola, whose commitment to quality public scholarship is unmatched, and Keith McCleary, or the folks I met later. My community has only expanded as the field as continued to grow and as CSS has matured, and I believe it is my most important goal as the president of the GSC to help build structures that make it as easy as possible for as many young scholars as possible to build communities like the one I’ve been so lucky to have.

Is there any recent shift in the field of comics studies that you are particularly excited about?

Personally, I think it’s hard for us to talk about shifts, since the field is still so new. I think the big thing is growth! I started grad school almost six years ago, and the number of scholars and high quality monographs has absolutely exploded since then. This is our golden age.

Who is the comics writer/artist/scholar that has most influenced the way you think about the field?

Gosh, you’re going to make me pick just one? I’m going to go ahead and cheat, again: the writer who matters the most to me in the world is Ursula LeGuin whose plain language, sympathy, and grace in constructing dangerous archipelagos and ambiguous utopias steels my will in the face of many uncertain futures. So that’s one thing, LeGuin is just everywhere in everything I do. But she also invented this sci-fi technology called the ansible radio, a piece of technology that allows the characters in her Hain Cycle to communicate with each other instantaneously across vast cosmic distances. Comics, like the ansible, are able to disrupt what should be possible in our experience of linear time, and are in fact all about exploring new ways to explicate temporal and spatial relationships. Comics are the ansible.

If you could choose one comic writer or artist to meet who would it be and why?

Sometimes I write about an Austin cartoonist named Jack Jackson, who was a part of the Undergrounds in the Bay before coming back to San Francisco and drawing these really dense, really wordy, really weird Texas history comics. He died, rather tragically, in 2006. In the second half of his career he tried to use his comics and illustration work to float his research into very specific aspects of Texas history: ranching, stuff like that. He had some interesting ideas about how to approach history in comics form and some controversial ones about what the ethics of doing history were. I would have loved to have gotten to talk to him about them, and about the breadth of his career.  

What are you currently working on and do you have plans for future projects?

Right now, I’m writing a dissertation about the early history of the comic strip. Focusing on one particularly famous R.F. Outcault strip (you probably know the one), the project frames comics as a uniquely nineteenth century technology of time and space, one intimately tied to other nineteenth social and cultural developments. Because I find it totally impossible to sit still or pick just one topic, I’ve also got an upcoming article on Jackson and I’m co-editing a roundtable on sound in comics with Osvaldo Oyola at his online magazine The Middle Spaces. Both should be out sometime next year. 

How can folks get in contact with you to talk more about comics or your research?

Carrier pigeon or bat phone. Or kopin@utexas.edu, whatever. I’m also on twitter @iamjoshkopin and I post pictures of comics, baseball and my food as joshexclamation on Instragram. 

If you’re a grad student with questions or ideas, or somebody who was once a PhD student with questions or ideas, I’d love to hear from you. There’s nothing more important to me than supporting my peers. Good luck out there!

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